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How should we respond to the death of Charles Manson?

How should we respond to the death of Charles Manson?

Heroindoesntcare.org, heroindoesntcare.org/ebook

How do we respond?

How do we respond to the death of Charles Manson?

The rumors had started to leak out. Criminal and cult leader Charles Manson who was the leader of the so-called Manson Family had been moved from Corcoran State Prison in Kings County, California to a hospital in Bakersfield, California.

Because even convicted mass-murders have a right to privacy news reports have been slow to release information. But it was confirmed this morning by the California Department of Corrections. Charles Manson dead at 83

Manson was charged with murder and conspiracy. He was found guilty and sentenced to death on December 1971. But California abolished the death penalty for a brief time on April 1972. So Manson’s sentence became life in prison.

During Manson’s stay in jail he has been feed, clothed, cared for medically all at taxer payer’s expense. So, how should we have responded to the medical needs of this convicted mass murderer?

Manson’s legal problems and his medical needs were two separate issues. As a society we judge and punish crimes but we care for and treat medical needs.

Well, at least that’s the way we claim it works. The fact is many of us set in judgment of people we think we are superior too. Yes, Manson’s was found guilty and sentence to death in the criminal justice system. But, what about the medical care system?

In a medical setting, choosing who lives and dies, is above our pay grade. I’m not God and neither are you. As a society, we give aid and do our best to save lives, without judgment as to who is “worthy.”

Heroindoesntcare.org Manson Dead at 83

I’m not God and neither are you.

This past summer I joined advocates in Butler County, Ohio calling out the sheriff’s department for not allowing sheriff deputies to administer live saving aid to people overdosing from opioids. A few days later a 10 year old in Florida died from an opioid overdose. No one knows how he came in contact with the drug.

Deciding who is “worthy” of treatment, which medical issue should be treated and who should live or die is not our call.

“The only thing Narcan enables is breathing.” Law enforcement personnel, first responders, and even the average person can be trained to administer CPR, perform the Heimlich maneuver and spray Narcan up a persons nose. We can save lives. It is our duty to save those we can without judgment of who is worthy. Yes, even Manson someone who had other people murdered received medical treatment NOT because he was more worthy then someone else but because we are humane.

We treat those with a medical need because we are humane.

Regardless of the decisions a person has make, no matter how unworthy you judge them to be, no matter how superior you foolishly believe you are; we render what aid we can to those in need. Because of who we are.

HeroinDoesntCare.org Manson dead

Because of who we are

BREAKING NEWS: FDA ANNOUNCE FIRST DEVICE TO HELP REDUCE WITHDRAWAL SYMPTOMS

Wednesday, November 15, 2017, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced it is permitting marketing of the first device to be used in helping to reduce the symptoms of opioid withdrawal, according to a press release.

Heroin Doesn't Care http://www.heroindoesntcare.org The Bridge

THE BRIDGE, The first FDA approved device to help reduce withdrawal symptoms

The Bridge Medical Device aka The Bridge is a small electrical nerve stimulator placed behind the patient’s ear. It looks a little like a hearing aid. In fact the average person would just assume it was a hearing aid.

The device sends electric pulses to stimulate nerves in the brain. These signals help provide relief from opioid withdraw symptom. The device can be used for five days, which is during the “acute physical withdrawal phase.”

Opioid withdrawal causes intense, violent physical withdrawal symptoms. They can include sweating, severe upset stomach, vomiting, a state of anxiety and agitation, insomnia, spasms, joint pain and more.

The severity of the withdraw symptom are measured on what is called a COWS score. COWS stands for Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale. In order to allow this device to start being marketed the FDA looks at evidence from studies using the COWS scores.

A COWS score can range from 0 to more then 36 – the higher the number the more severe the symptoms.

So what can this device do? The average person in opioid withdraw has a COWS score of over 20. The FDA studies showed that The Bridge reduced the score by over 30% within 30 minutes in 88% of patients. But many people have reduced the score to single digits.

WAIT, this is not a silver bullet. It is only part of a recovery plan.
A good plan of action will include: detox, perhaps Medically Assisted Treatment (MIT) and counseling.

Your plan could include: detox using The Bridge, MIT using Vivitrol and recovery counseling. Counseling MUST be included.

You can find the press release here.

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We want to give you a gift. It’s an eBook copy of Heroin Addiction & Recovery 101, One man’s understanding of the opium invasion

UNDERSTAND, an eBook is a downloadable file you can read on your electronic devices.
Download your copy of the eBook “Heroin Addiction & Recovery 101, one man’s understanding if the opium invasion” click HERE Sent a copy of the link to a friend.

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He should have died, surprising reason he’s alive

He Should Have Died, Surprising Reason He’s Alive

He Should Have Died, Surprising Reason He's Alive

He Should Have Died That Day, But Here Is The Surprising Reason He’s Alive

Around the age of 43ish I started having hives for no know reason. By age 48 I started making the rounds of the local emergency rooms. I would have major hives, trouble breathing, about to pass out. The 1st ER had misdiagnosed the problem as a panic attack. Each ER just repeated what the first one told me. Seven ER visits later a nurse told me, “This is not a panic attack it’s a food allergy. Go get checked.” Because I took the nurse’s advice I was correctly diagnosed with a gluten allergy and was prescribed an Epipen.

On November 11, 2006 I started having symptoms. Hives on top of hives, trouble breathing, about to pass out. But, I had left the Epipen at home. I had Sara who was with me call her mom and tell her she would have find the pen and drive me to the St. E emergency room, that I was driving to the house.

Arriving home and picking up Donna I slid over to the passenger seat and auto-injected as she drove to the hospital. I was so weak when I arrived in the emergency room I didn’t have the strength to even open my eyes. They could not find my blood pressure.

An hour and a half later the ER doctor came out and broke the news to Donna and Sara, “There is no reason for that man to be alive, I’ve never seen an Anaphylactic go that far and come back.”

I had gone into full-blown Anaphylactic shock. And I had come back from the edge.

Today I am super careful about what I eat and try to remember my Epipen. But more importantly, I’m grateful to be alive.
I’ve had three grandsons born since then, graduated from NKU with not one but two degrees. Now days I spend most of my time advocating for people trying to find treatment for opioid addiction.

I started a group called Heroin Doesn’t Care. HDC has a Facebook page, twitter page and a blog. We do our best to help people in addiction get into treatment, help families establish a plan of action. But most of all we try to explain to people who thing they are on the outside of this issue that they have a resource to learn the truth about opioid addiction. I wrote an eBook titled, “Heroin Addiction & Recovery 101, One Man’s Understanding of The Opium Invasion.”

A few months ago while filming an interview for a documentary dealing with opioid addiction and recovery a young lady came up and ask if I was Ron Calhoun. I told her yes and she said, “We have never met, but you saved my live, and I wanted to say thank you.” WOW. (I’m setting here right now, with tears in my eyes.) The only thing I could do was give her a hug.

But, I didn’t save her. I helped raised money to get her into detox and a sober living home. But, the people who donated are the real lifesavers.

I call November 15th Ron Calhoun Should Have Died Day. I celebrate the day every year and celebrate life every day. I hug a little longer, tell people I love them and believe with all my heart that God has a plan for each of us.

The doctor was wrong, there is a reason I’m still alive. If you’re reading this and you have not downloaded and read the eBook I invite you to download it here.

There is a reason.

***Thank you for stopping by our website heroindoesntcare.org***

We want to give you a gift. It’s an eBook copy of Heroin Addiction & Recovery 101, One man’s understanding of the opium invasion

UNDERSTAND, an eBook is a downloadable file you can read on your electronic devices.
Download your copy of the eBook “Heroin Addiction & Recovery 101, one man’s understanding if the opium invasion” click HERE Sent a copy of the link to a friend.

While you’re here please click here to subscribe to our Blog IT”S FREE

Enter your email address in the box on the right to subscribe and stay up to date with the latest news in recovery.

You can also follow us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/heroindoesntcare/

What’s heartbreaking is this week was “an ordinary week” in the battle against heroin

What’s heartbreaking is this week was “an ordinary week in the battle against heroin.”

Sixty reporters, photographers, videographers cover opioids abuse in 1 city for 1 week. What’s heartbreaking is this was “an ordinary week.”

Sadly, this is “an ordinary week” in the battle against heroin.

Cincinnati is a wonderful town. They are known for being the home to the first professional baseball team in Major League Baseball, the Cincinnati Reds. One of the areas best-known companies is Procter & Gamble. P&G is the company that makes Ivory Soap. In the early days of radio they sponsored daily programs, which are now called soap operas because of the soap company. Greater Cincinnati is about as All-America as they come.

And like far too many American towns and cities they have a problem with opioids abuse.

The Cincinnati Enquirer sent 60 journalists, which include reporters, photographers, videographers out into the community for 7 days to report back about the opioid crisis.

I’m including a link to the story here, which includes an outstanding video record of the coverage. Video link here

https://www.cincinnati.com/pages/interactives/seven-days-of-heroin-epidemic-cincinnati/

Watch Video, https://www.usatoday.com/videos/news/nation/2017/09/10/seven-days-heroin-what-epidemic-looks-like/105463288/

I’m going to ask a favor. After you watch, please share this post with friends and family. This is our story and you and I need to be a part of the conversation.

***Thank you for stopping by our website heroindoesntcare.org***

We want to give you a gift. It’s an eBook copy of Heroin Addiction & Recovery 101, One man’s understanding of the opium invasion

UNDERSTAND, an eBook is a downloadable file you can read on your electronic devices.
Download your copy of the eBook “Heroin Addiction & Recovery 101, one man’s understanding if the opium invasion” click HERE

While you’re here please click here to subscribe to our Blog IT”S FREE

Enter your email address in the box on the right to subscribe and stay up to date with the latest news in recovery.

You can also follow us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/heroindoesntcare/

Free eBook, Heroin Addiction & Recovery 101, One man’s understanding of the opium invasion

When a family learns someone they love is an addict, too often, they have no clue where to go, what to do, or how this happened.

I wrote this short 25 page eBook to give simple answers to questions about how the opioid crisis started, how good people became addicts, how to develop a plan for recovery that’s works.

Heroin Addiction & Recovery 101