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The 5 Stages of Changing a Behavior

This may be the most important thing you ever read about addiction and recovery.

Doctors James O. Prochaska and Carlo Di Clemente researched people who successfully recovered from alcoholism, drug addiction, and other negative behaviors, for example, smoking. They found 5 stages people go through while moving to recovery.

The following has been copied directly from Wikipedia. The Wikipedia page does a better job of explaining this than I could. A link to the page is at the bottom of this post. I make no claim as to ownership or copyright. This information is offered as part of Wikipedia’s Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.

The 5 Stages of Changing a Behavior

Stage 1: Precontemplation (not ready)

People at this stage do not intend to start the healthy behavior in the near future (within 6 months) and may be unaware of the need to change. People here learn more about healthy behavior: they are encouraged to think about the pros of changing their behavior and to feel emotions about the effects of their negative behavior on others.

Precontemplators typically underestimate the pros of changing, overestimate the cons, and often are not aware of making such mistakes.

One of the most effective steps that others can help with at this stage is to encourage them to become more mindful of their decision making and more conscious of the multiple benefits of changing an unhealthy behavior.

Stage 2: Contemplation (getting ready)

At this stage, participants are intending to start the healthy behavior within the next 6 months. While they are usually now more aware of the pros of changing, their cons are about equal to their Pros. This ambivalence about changing can cause them to keep putting off taking action.

People here learn about the kind of person they could be if they changed their behavior and learn more from people who behave in healthy ways.

Others can influence and help effectively at this stage by encouraging them to work at reducing the cons of changing their behavior.

Stage 3: Preparation (ready)

People at this stage are ready to start taking action within the next 30 days. They take small steps that they believe can help them make the healthy behavior a part of their lives. For example, they tell their friends and family that they want to change their behavior.

People in this stage should be encouraged to seek support from friends they trust, tell people about their plan to change the way they act and think about how they would feel if they behaved in a healthier way. Their number one concern is: when they act, will they fail? They learn that the better prepared they are, the more likely they are to keep progressing.

Stage 4: Action (current action)

People at this stage have changed their behavior within the last 6 months and need to work hard to keep moving ahead. These participants need to learn how to strengthen their commitments to change and to fight urges to slip back.

People in this stage progress by being taught techniques for keeping up their commitments such as substituting activities related to the unhealthy behavior with positive ones, rewarding themselves for taking steps toward changing, and avoiding people and situations that tempt them to behave in unhealthy ways.

Stage 5: Maintenance (monitoring)

People at this stage changed their behavior more than 6 months ago. It is important for people at this stage to be aware of situations that may tempt them to slip back into doing the unhealthy behavior—particularly stressful situations.

It is recommended that people in this stage seek support from and talk with people whom they trust, spend time with people who behave in healthy ways and remember to engage in healthy activities to cope with stress instead of relying on unhealthy behavior.

Relapse (recycling)

Relapse in the TTM specifically applies to individuals who successfully quit smoking or using drugs or alcohol, only to resume these unhealthy behaviors. Individuals who attempt to quit highly addictive behaviors such as drug, alcohol and tobacco use are at particularly high risk of a relapse. Achieving a long-term behavior change often requires ongoing support from family members, a health coach, a physician, or another motivational source. Supportive literature and other resources can also be helpful to avoid a relapse from happening.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transtheoretical_model#Stages_of_change

Here is another blog post about the 5 stages

For more information about the stages of recovery Google, The Transtheoretical Model.
Check this out…
http://stepupprogram.org/docs/handouts/STEPUP_Stages_of_Change.pdf

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Addressing Opioid Addiction and Focusing On Solutions.

Addressing Opioid Addiction and Focusing On Solutions.

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Addressing Opioid Addiction and Focusing On Solutions.

This is not a comprehensive list. It is not everything that could or should be addressed in looking for solutions to the opioid crisis. It is simply a look at four industries and four points that equally must be addressed in order to start focusing on solutions and addressing challenges.

Pharmaceutical companies can no longer pay kickbacks to the medical industry to “push” drugs.

Insurance companies will provide access to adequate treatment.

• In order to reduce recidivism, reduce cost and provide rehabilitation the judicial system will provide proven treatment to people with addiction.

The treatment industry focusing on solutions thinks long-term; providing on-demand treatment, medically assisted treatment (MAT) with long-term counseling and relapse prevention.

These four industries: pharmaceutical companies, insurance companies, the judicial system and the treatment industry are crucial to finding and focusing on solutions to the opioid crisis.

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***Thank you for stopping by our website heroindoesntcare.org***

We want to give you a gift. It’s an eBook copy of Heroin Addiction & Recovery 101, One man’s understanding of the opium invasion

UNDERSTAND, an eBook is a downloadable file you can read on your electronic devices.
Download your copy of the eBook “Heroin Addiction & Recovery 101, one man’s understanding if the opium invasion” click HERE Sent a copy of the link to a friend.

While you’re here please click here to subscribe to our Blog IT”S FREE

Enter your email address in the box on the right to subscribe and stay up to date with the latest news in recovery.

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You can also follow us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/heroindoesntcare/

HeroinDoesntCare.org, opioid crisis,

Pharmacutical kickbacks must stop

HeroinDoesntCare.org,

Insurance companies must provide access to treatment.

HeroinDoesntCare.org,

The judicial system

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Treatment providers

While her heart was breaking she never told her friends the truth

HeroinDoesntCare.org

While her heart was breaking…

“Someone you know by name,
someone you call a friend,
their heart is breaking
because a loved one is trapped
in addiction. They really want
to ask you to pray for them.
But they are afraid of
how you will judge them.”
– Ron Calhoun

She had driven 150 miles to attend the awareness rally. It was the Saturday before Mother’s Day and it would be her first Mother’s Day without her son.

She told the crowd how her son had become addicted, how he had broken the news of his drug use to her and about all the times she had tried to help find treatment for her only child.

She explained that her friends and the people at church found out about his addiction as they learned of his funeral.

While her heart was breaking she never told her friends the truth

A few years later I was speaking at a church meeting, several people came up to me to talk about my work as an advocate for those in addiction. One concerned lady asked me about “those people.” So I told her, “Understand, someone you know by name, someone you call a friend, their heart is breaking because a child or other loved one is trapped in addiction. They really want to ask you to pray for them. But they are afraid of how you will judge them.”

With genuine compassion on her face, she tilted her head and started thinking then thoughtfully said, “No. I don’t think so.”

I didn’t tell her I was having lunch the next day with one of her friends whose daughter had been addicted to opioids for 10 years. It wasn’t until the next year when her friend’s daughter had died of an overdose that she learned the sad truth. Yes, someone you know is living this nightmare every day and they have no one to talk to about it, no one to cry with and no one to pray with them.

Heroin Doesn’t Care so we have to.

CALL TO ACTION: Speak softly, listen with your heart.

***Thank you for stopping by our website heroindoesntcare.org***

We want to give you a gift.
It’s an eBook copy of Heroin Addiction & Recovery 101, One man’s understanding of the opium invasion

UNDERSTAND, an eBook is a downloadable file you can read on your electronic devices.
Download your copy of the eBook “Heroin Addiction & Recovery 101” click HERE And you can sent a copy of the link to a friend.

While you’re here please click here to subscribe to our Blog IT’S FREE

Enter your email address in the box on the right to subscribe and stay up to date with the latest news in recovery.

You can also follow us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/heroindoesntcare/

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STOP Using Stigma Images: A Call To Action For The Media

We need new visual images.

HeroinDoesntCare.org Stigma Images

STOP Using Stigma Images:
A Call To Action For The Media

When you watch or read news about the opioid crisis the most used visual images are needles, spoons, lighters, white power, pills and so on.

ALL of those items are triggers and add to the stigma of opioid addiction.

Call to Action: We need to come up with new non-trigger, non-stigma visual images the media can use when reporting on the opioid crisis.

Images are powerful. They can soften the heart or poison the mind.

Not too long ago racial images were standard in everything from children’s books, movies and print media. This took time to change and part of the change happened because opinion were also changing. But all of this happened because old opinion and beliefs were challenged.

We need to come up with images that we and the media can use that are not triggers and don’t add to sigma of addiction.

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It is killing people, keeping them in addiction and you can go to jail

Body brokering is killing people, it is keeping people in addiction and it is against the law.

http://www.heroindoesntcare.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/It-is-killing-people HeroinDoesntCare.png

It is killing people, keeping them in addiction and you can go to jail

Body Brokers may thing the are helping people, buy they are making things worst.

Here is a link to an article from Partnership for Drug-Free Kids. I claim no copyright or ownership.

https://drugfree.org/parent-blog/my-son-is-a-victim-of-a-broken-addiction-treatment-system/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=PARENT&utm_campaign=patient-brokering#more

Even with the best of intentions body brokers are part of cruel, illegal operation.

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